Skipper Bob Publications

Cruising Guide Series

Add New Waterway Update

Waterway Nav Updates

Cuba

Sort By Mile Marker | Sorting By Date

Click here for a printable version.


Approach to Baitiquiri

Date Posted: May 22, 2017

There are no off-lying hazards either to the west or the east of the bay. Simply come to a position approximately 20° 01.0’N 74° 50.8’W, from where the small metal-frame lighthouse (Fl 6 secs.) on the east side of the entrance will be clearly visible. Farther up the channel you should be able to pick out a green and a red post (both lighted, although not always working), with additional marks father up the channel. Beyond the posts are some mangroves on the west side of the channel.

You should line up the outer edge of the mangroves midway between the two posts, on a bearing of 322°T, and then come straight in between the posts.

See Waterway Guide Cuba for complete details on navigation and approaches.

Source: Waterway Guide Cuba

No Comments to display.

Add Comment


Approach to Ensenada de Mata

Date Posted: May 22, 2017

Come to approximately 20° 18.0’N 74° 22.6’W, which is more or less on the 20m line. Looking into the bay you will see a small house up on a hillside (bearing 213°T), somewhat to the right (west) of mid-channel. Come in up the center of the channel on a heading of 210°T for the head of the bay. The channel is relatively wide, and quite straightforward. Once inside the two (inner) rocky headlands, anchor reasonably soon, more-or-less in the middle of the bay, since the bottom shoals on all sides. The best protection will be found by easing over towards the village on the east side of the bay, but you will not be able to get very close in.

When leaving, sail midway between the rocky headlands on a heading of 030°T, and maintain this heading at least until over the 10m line in order to avoid coral areas on both sides of the entrance.

See Waterway Guide Cuba for complete details on navigation and approaches.

Source: Waterway Guide Cuba

No Comments to display.

Add Comment


Approach to Baracoa

Date Posted: May 22, 2017

There are no offlying dangers when approaching Baracoa from any direction. The harbor is at the NW corner of a large, open bay (the Bahia de la Miel). El Yunque, with its flat top and steep sides, is unmistakable from many miles out. You come in on a mostly westerly heading for the mountain. As you get closer, you will be able to pick out the harbor entrance just to the north of the Malecon (the sea wall) behind which are a number of white apartment buildings. A position at approximately 20° 21.4’N 74° 29.7’W will put you right outside the harbor, which is then entered on a heading of 255°T.

Once inside the harbor entrance you will see a large hulk beached immediately to the south. Simply hook around to the SSW of this wreck and anchor off the dock in 3m to 4m. The officials will soon be out. You will probably be asked to put out a stern anchor, as this is the custom here. When going ashore you can leave the dinghy on the main dock, or dinghy over to the dock at the base of the hotel on the north side of the harbor.

See Waterway Guide Cuba for complete details on navigation and approaches.

Source: Waterway Guide Cuba

No Comments to display.

Add Comment


Entering the Ensenada Taco Anchorage

Date Posted: May 22, 2017

The entrance is easy enough, but since it involves transiting a relatively narrow, unmarked channel it requires attention to detail. First come to a position at approximately 20° 31.6’N 74 39.7’W, and then maneuver so that the midpoint of the NW side of the channel (this will be easy enough to pick out) bears 248°T. Come in for this midpoint, making whatever allowance may be necessary to compensate for any tidal set. 

Once inside an imaginary line drawn between the two headlands at the mouth of the channel, come to a heading of 210°T, straight up the center of the channel. The depths going in will steadily shoal to a minimum of 7m about midway through the entrance, and then increase again on the inside to 10m or more in the center of the bay, shoaling towards the edges. (Note that these shoals come up quite suddenly, so maneuver with caution.)

See Waterway Guide Cuba for complete details on navigation and approaches.

Source: Waterway Guide Cuba

No Comments to display.

Add Comment


Entering Bahia de Cayo Moa

Date Posted: May 22, 2017

There are two channels into the protected waters behind Cayo Moa and the reef. The northwestern channel, a big-ship channel, is wide, deep, and well-marked; the southeastern channel is wide enough (1500+ feet) and deep (30m to 40m), but quite intricate and without a single marker, with the sides shoaling out dramatically to dangerous reef. This southeastern channel should only be attempted in calm conditions and good light, and even then we would not want to transit it without a first-class chart, and electronic plotting equipment, particularly since once inside the reef quite a bit of relatively intricate navigation is still needed to proceed towards Moa, with many shoals and isolated rocks to be avoided.

For the northwest channel, come to a point at approximately 20° 41.2’N 74° 52.2’W. The entrance to the channel is marked with G1, which is left to port (i.e., you pass to the west of it). The channel is entered on a heading of 211°T for the range markers (clearly visible). Once inside, you curve either to the west (down the well-marked channel), or the SE (leaving the R4B nun [cone] buoy to starboard - i.e. passing to the east of it), and then proceed to one of the anchorages.

See Waterway Guide Cuba for complete details on navigation and approaches.

Source: Waterway Guide Cuba

No Comments to display.

Add Comment


Entering Bahia de Tanamo

Date Posted: May 22, 2017

Because of its narrow, twisting entrance the mouth of the bay is difficult to pick out from offshore. To find it, come to a position at approximately 20° 43.5’N 75° 19.5’W from where the outer channel marker (G1 buoy) is clearly visible. The channel is entered on a heading of 180°T for a range light on the bank a mile ahead, leaving the G1 buoy to port (i.e., passing to the west of it). As the range light is approached, the channel makes a sharp turn to the west, and then .33 mile later (at Punta Gitana) the bay itself begins to open out with Cayo Juanillo immediately to the south.

See Waterway Guide Cuba for complete details on navigation and approaches.

Source: Waterway Guide Cuba

No Comments to display.

Add Comment


Approach to Bahia Levisa and Cabonico

Date Posted: May 22, 2017

The entrance to the bays is at the SW corner of this section of the coastline and, therefore, relatively easy to locate. In any event, come to a position at approximately 20° 45.0’N 75° 28.3’W, from where the outer channel marker (G1) will be clearly visible. This is left to port (i.e., pass to the west of it). Note that this buoy sits a little south of the northern extremity of the reef to the east of the bay and so, if coming from the east, on no account cut the corner down to the buoy. The channel into the Bahia Levisa is well-marked from this outer buoy; from there the Bahia de Cabonico branches off to the SE without further buoyage. (The Bahia de Cabonico contains numerous shoals and so is not considered important for navigation.) We have no information on the interiors of the bays.

See Waterway Guide Cuba for complete details on navigation and approaches.

Source: Waterway Guide Cuba

No Comments to display.

Add Comment


Entering Bahia de Nipe

Date Posted: May 22, 2017

Come to a position at approximately 20°49.0’N 75° 31.6’W, about a mile to the north of the metalframe lighthouse (Fl 6 secs). From here a couple of (red) range lights can be seen on the hillside to the SSW, on a bearing of 202°T. You head for the range until the channel opens out to the west. Continue down the channel until past the G3 buoy off the tip of Punta Carenero, from where the Guarda post can be seen on the point. Hook around to the west of the buoy (don’t cut inside it) and proceed slowly to the south past the Guarda post. If you are lucky, you may get past to anchor off the hotel dock but, then again, you may be told to stop and anchor while the officials are rounded up, which could take an hour or two since they must come from the port of Antilla, well inside the bay. If you have to anchor, you will need to come in almost to the beach, since the bottom drops off precipitously with depths of 20m or more.

See Waterway Guide Cuba for complete details on navigation and approaches.

Source: Waterway Guide Cuba

No Comments to display.

Add Comment


Entering Bahia de Naranjo

Date Posted: May 22, 2017

Come to approximately 21° 07.3’N 75° 53.3’W from where the entrance to the bay will be clearly visible with the lighthouse on the east side. Up inside the bay you will be able to see a conspicuous white building (part of the aquarium complex). Bring this building onto a bearing of 150°T and then head straight for it, midway between the two buoys marking the channel mouth (R2 and G3, both lit). On the east side of the channel you will see a dock servicing one of the hotels. It is possible to find anchoring depths off this dock. Otherwise, once inside the outer channel buoys, follow the markers towards the marina. After passing through the last pair of markers (two lighted posts, R18 and G17) anchor in front of the marina in 5m or 6m.

See Waterway Guide Cuba for complete details on navigation and approaches.

Source: Waterway Guide Cuba

No Comments to display.

Add Comment


Entering Puerto de Vita

Date Posted: May 22, 2017

To enter Puerto de Vita there is a conspicuous white tower .5 n.m. to the east of the channel that will be visible from many miles away. Come to 21°06.1’N 075°58.0’W. As you approach look for a large floating green can that marks the beginning of the channel. The channel into the bay is well marked with red and green floating buoys. Keep the red buoys to starboard and stay mid-channel, which will be a minimum of 10m deep until well into the bay. When the tide is running there is often 1-2kts. of current in the channel so be sure to watch your drift as you follow the curves of the channel.

When the channel opens into the bay, the commercial docks and the Guarda Frontera station, which will usually have a patrol boat docked in front, will come into view to the SE. Maintain a sharp lookout for a small floating bifurcation buoy that marks the green side of the channel into the marina. When you are within 100 feet of the bifurcation mark, make a sharp right turn to a SW heading and look for two rows of pillar buoys leading towards the marina. Note that the marina will not be visible from this point.

The channel leading towards the marina is quite narrow and shallows rapidly to under 1m outside of the marks. Keep the green markers to port and come to 21°04.38’N 075°57.49’W where the marina will come into view to port.

See Waterway Guide Cuba for complete details on navigation and approaches.

Source: Waterway Guide Cuba

No Comments to display.

Add Comment


Next Page >>
Skipper Bob is proud to be a sponsor of: